Summer 2024 Undergrad Courses

Course bulletin view / download PDF:

Summer Session I: June 3 – July 1, 2024

ENGL 25000
Introduction to Literacy Study

1159 Sec. 1AA TBA M TU W TH 8:30am – 11:05am

This course offers an introduction for beginning English majors to the practices and concepts in the study of literature. We will think carefully about literature as a form of representation – about what literary texts mean as well as how they mean. The course will help students to develop a critical vocabulary and method for reading and writing about literature, as well as introduce them to the cultural contexts and backgrounds of various literary traditions. Our readings will explore a variety of genres and styles – short fiction, the novel, narrative poetry, lyric poetry, and forms of drama. Above all, this is a class in reading and (frequent) writing which will emphasize close reading techniques, interpretive approaches, the making of arguments, and the development of individual critical voices in order to prepare students to succeed in advanced English elective courses.

300- Level Literature Course

Please note: 300-level classes assume some background and prior experience at the 200-level. Students should complete two 200 level courses before embarking on 300 level work. Generally, these classes require two shorter essays and one longer assignment or final paper involving research or reference to secondary materials.

ENGL 37604
Cinematic World Building

1846 Sec. 1MM Robert Balun M TU W TH 2:30pm – 5:05pm

(Note: on TU and TH the class meets online synchronously)

In this course will consider the ways in which films and television shows construct distinct worlds through

visual techniques and storytelling. By turning a critical eye to the concept of world building, we will seek to

understand how this technique works, as well as how this aesthetic inquiry helps to shed light upon, and gain

greater understanding of, our own world and how we move through it.

In addition to the relevant examples of world building found in the science fiction and fantasy genres, we will

also consider films that more closely resemble this world. We will also crowd source supplemental examples

from the expertise of our class. We might even examine a video game or two. Those with an interest in sci-fi,

fantasy, RPGs, video games, game design, and aesthetics are encouraged to enroll!

Potential media to include: 8 1⁄2 (Fellini), Adventure Time (Ward), Atlantics (Diop), The Big Lebowski (Joel &

Ethan Cohen), Blade Runner (Scott), Brick (Johnson), The Conversation (Coppola), The Empire Strikes Back

(Lucas/Kershner), Everything Everywhere All at Once (Daniels), The Holy Mountain (Jodoroswky), Ikiru

(Kurosawa), Lovecraft Country (Green), Nomadland (Zhao), Nope (Peele), The Shining (Kubrick), Spirited

Away (Miyazaki), Stalker (Tarkovsky), Super Mario World (Miyamoto), Tigers Are Not Afriad (López), Twin

Peaks (Lynch), Under the Cherry Moon (Prince).

Creative Writing Course

ENGL 22000
Introduction to Creative Writing

1160 Sec. 1LL TBA M TU W TH 11:30am – 2:05pm

Introductory Creative Writing will be an intensive exploration of writing between and beyond the spectrum of poetry and prose. Students will be introduced to contemporary texts and devices to inform their own developing writing practice, which will culminate in a hand bound book in print.

Summer 2024 Academic Calendar Session Two

Dates are subject to change

DATESDAYS

March

March 1

May

May 31

June

June 28

July July 4

Friday

Friday

Friday

Thursday

Application for degree for Summer 2024 begins

Deadline for filing application for degree for Summer 2024 Graduation

Last day to apply for Study Abroad

College Closed

July 7SundayLast day of Registration;
Last day to file ePermit;
Last day to join waitlist for Summer Two courses; Last day to drop classes for 100% tuition refund
July 8MondayStart of Summer Session Two; Classes begin;
Initial Registration Appeals begin
July 9TuesdayLast day to add a class to an existing enrollment; Last day for 50% tuition refund;
Last day to apply for Audit option;
Last day for Independent Study; Initial Registration Appeals end
July 10WednesdayCourse Withdrawal drop period begins (A grade of ‘WD’ is assigned to students who officially drop a class)
July 12FridayLast day for 25% tuition refund;
Last day to drop without the grade of ‘W’;
Course Withdrawal period ends (Last day for ‘WD’ grades)
July 13SaturdayStart of 100% tuition obligation for course drops;
Course Withdrawal period begins (A grade of ‘W’ is assigned to students who officially drop a class) – No refund;

July 30

August

August 1

August 2

August 5

Tuesday

Thursday

Friday Monday

Last Day to file for P/NC option

Course Withdrawal Period ends. Last day to withdraw from a class with the grade of “W”;
Last day of classes;
Final Exams

Final Grade Submission Deadline – Summer Session Two

Summer Session II: July 8 – August 2, 2024 300- Level Literature Courses

Please note: 300-level classes assume some background and prior experience at the 200-level. Students should complete two 200 level courses before embarking on 300 level work. Generally, these classes require two shorter essays and one longer assignment or final paper involving research or reference to secondary materials.

ENGL 36906

#HotLaborSummer: Labor Movement/Working Class Rhetorics

1255 Sec. 2AA Olivia Wood

M TU W TH

8:30am – 11:05am

The U.S. labor movement is experiencing a surge of new growth. Workers at major companies like Amazon and Starbucks are unionizing. Summer 2023 saw strikes from the WGA and SAG-AFTRA, hotel workers in LA, and a very near strike by UPS Teamsters. Higher education itself is one of the labor movement hot spots. Will 2024 bring a new #HotLaborSummer?

This surge presents a series of critical rhetorical situations with high and immediate stakes: how can workers convince their coworkers to unionize, or to go on strike? How can workers convince others to support their strikes? During an organizing drive or a contract campaign, workers and employers wage rhetorical battle with one another during class struggle. An enormous amount of writing is produced: press coverage, social media posts, bargaining updates, emails, and more. In this class, we’ll examine the different rhetorical strategies and genres that organized workers use to achieve their goals, with a focus on contemporary movements and current events, alongside key historical works of working class rhetoric and rhetorical scholarship. Students will choose a particular labor struggle at the beginning of the summer term and analyze the rhetorics at play in a series of scaffolded activities culminating in a final project.

ENGL 37610

How to Watch Movies

1883 Sec. 2LL Chester Kozlowski

(Note: the class meets online synchronously)

M TU W TH

11:30am – 2:05pm

This course examines film-watching from a literary and technical perspective. What are the eras’ limitations? How are scenes constructed? What is the effect of lighting and music? How did film go from a “magic trick” to becoming a tentpole of popular culture. The course also delves into storytelling and compares some movies to the literature that inspired it. Films and excerpts include Charlie Chaplin’s silent comedies, Rebel without a Cause, The Godfather, Fight Club, Tår, and digital breakthroughs in special effects.

ENGL 23000
Writing Workshop in Prose

Creative Writing Course

1156 Sec. 2AA TBA M TU W TH 8:30am – 11:05pm

In this course the varieties of prose writing, excluding fiction, will be practiced. The class is devoted to exploring such nonfictional forms as personal essay writing, reportage, memoir and biographical writing, sketches and opinion pieces. Throughout the semester students will read exemplary works from each area of nonfiction and will also spend considerable time practicing the genre through continuous exercises given by the instructor each week. Students will also learn to revise their works, respond to their peers’ writing, and work toward one to two major papers assigned for the semester.